Cher reportedly has her mansion in Malibu, Calif. on the market now for $45,000,000.

The Wall Street Journal today wrote about Cher's listing of her 13,126-square-foot mansion, which is at 25142 Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu. However, the Journal clearly has a very, very short memory; as we noted back on May 2, 2007, Cher actually first listed the mansion way back in 2001 for $25,000,000. And in January 2007, the Los Angeles Times' Ruth Ryon reported that Cher had planned to keep the mansion and completely redesign it.

Most recently, our pals over at the Real Estalker were dead on with this (as they so often are), reporting on to rumors of Cher's mansion going on the market; back on March 7, Your Mama wrote that she had heard that Cher wanted more than $40,000,000 for the mansion in a pocket listing (i.e., not on the market). A pocket listing it does indeed appear to be (to speak like Yoda). As of this morning, however, the mansion still is not shown in the Los Angeles County MLS. Cher's mansion did indeed finally go up on the MLS on Friday, August 1, so it's no longer a pocket listing. Given the timing of the Journal article and the timing of the official listing in the MLS, it's not at all inconceivable that the item was handed to the paper as an exclusive -- promised by the listing agent in conjunction with the agent agreeing not to upload the listing to the MLS (for us all to see) until after the story ran. If our suggested sequence of events indeed is how things transpired, it's unclear what the listing agent hoped to achieve by having the exclusive in the Journal instead of the Los Angeles Times' 'Hot Property' column. But, assuming that that's how things happened, one can only assume that the agent preferred the high-profile coverage across the Journal's national (and high-income) readership area. Almost like a free ad, really.

UPDATE: Cher's mansion did indeed finally go up on the MLS on Friday, August 1, so it's no longer a pocket listing. Given the timing of the Journal article and the timing of the official listing in the MLS, it's not at all inconceivable that the item was handed to the paper as an exclusive -- promised by the listing agent in conjunction with the agent agreeing not to upload the listing to the MLS (for us all to see) until after the story ran. If our suggested sequence of events indeed is how things transpired, it's unclear what the listing agent hoped to achieve by having the exclusive in the Journal instead of the Los Angeles Times' 'Hot Property' column. But, assuming that that's how things happened, one can only assume that the agent preferred the high-profile coverage across the Journal's national (and high-income) readership area. Almost like a free ad, really.